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Iceland

Sticker/Magnet Icelandic Flag

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Stickers and Magnets Iceland

The Iceland flag sticker can be purchased in packages of 4 or 12 stickers. The dimensions of the Iceland sticker are 5.5x10 centimeters. The adhesives are made of vinyl 200 g in adhesive PVC with a glossy plastic cover that makes them resistant to water and UV rays for 5 years. Buy the Iceland flag sticker The Alabama magnetic flag measures 3.5x5.5 cm and can be purchased individually or in packs of 4.
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Islanda

Choose the material:

Adhesive PVC Ideal for Indoor and Outdoor Environments

Magnetic Ideal for metal surfaces




Size:

Quantity:

Price: (VAT included)

See all available sizes

Size & Pricing Comparison table for Iceland:

Flag Format

Items in the bundle

Price

3.5x5.5 cm

Magnetic

1

Price:

2,00 €

(VAT included)

3.5x5.5 cm

Magnetic

4

Price:

6,00 €

(VAT included)

5.5x10 cm

Adhesive PVC

4

Price:

4,00 €

(VAT included)

5.5x10 cm

Adhesive PVC

12

Price:

11,00 €

(VAT included)

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The flag of Iceland is officially described by Law No. 34 of June 17, 1944, the day Iceland became a republic. The civilian national flag of Icelanders is blue as the sky with a snow-white cross, and a red-fire cross inside the white cross. The arms of the cross extend to the edges of the flag. The civil flag of Iceland has been used as an unofficial symbol since 1913. It was officially chosen on 19 June 1915, to represent Iceland as a territory of Denmark, and was used at sea from 1 December 1918. On 17 June 1944 it was adopted as an emblem of the independent republic of Iceland. Like other flags with the Scandinavian cross, it is inspired by the Danish flag Dannebrog. Since 1897, on the proposal of the writer Einar Benediktsson, it was in use - not authorized (with the excuse that it was too similar to the Greek flag) - a celestial flag with a white cross.